GreaseMaster

Immersion and Rubber

Rear End Weight

Rear End Weight

This is a vibration damper weight off the front of the 8.8" rear end that came in my '93 Mustang. It was covered in gear oil on the right side from a recent fill just before I bought it. I thought this was the perfect opportunity to test GreaseMaster as an immersion cleaner. Click image to enlarge.

Immersing the Weight

Immersing the Weight

I filled up a plastic container with five quarts of hot water heated it in a microwave. I then proceeded to add a tablespoon (two ounces) of GreaseMaster to the solution (about 40:1), mixed it with the water and immersed the weight. I wasn't sure of the temperature, it was scalding to the touch but not boiling (literally). I put a thick piece of cardboard over the top to help keep the heat in for as long as possible. Click image to enlarge.

Oil Separation

Oil Separation

I left the weight in the solution for almost 24 hours (mostly due to the fact that I couldn't get back to it rather than looking for an intended result). As you can see around the edges of the solution, the oil has been de-emulsified and is floating on the surface. I chose not to provide any agitation (as I'd seen done by TMT Services at their facility in their instructional videos when using it in an immersion application) to see how well it would work at lifting oil without any help. Click image to enlarge.

Washed Weight

Washed Weight

I pulled the weight out of the solution and used a garden hose with a spray nozzle on it to wash the part off. The water was cold and my experience has shown that that definitely reduces the water's ability to wash off GreaseMaster, but it came off easily anyway. As you can see, the dirt was removed as well. I did notice a slightly oily film left on the side that was covered in the gear oil, and decided to test it with some GreaseMaster sprayed on and brushed with a nylon bristled detail brush, followed by wiping it clean to remove the excess GreaseMaster and then finished by washing it off in warm water. Click image to enlarge.

After Agitation

After Agitation

The oil was completely removed. To be fair, I think that had I started by agitating the part during its immersion or afterwards with a brush before washing it off, then doing so in warm water, the results would have been better as I have seen deposits worse than this come off easily when using some form of agitation, whether that be higher water pressure or manual agitation with a brush or rag. You might notice the rubber bushing insert on the left appears to be dirtier in this photo than the previous, that is actually rust that has dried more completely and shows up better against the black bushing. I used this bushing to show the effects of Rusteco on rubber in a test in the next section below. Click image to enlarge.

Rubber Note

Rubber Note

As claimed, GreaseMaster cleaned the rubber of oil and dirt beautifully (photo is a close up of the bushing on the right up top), leaving no detectable oil deposits and didn't harm or dry out the rubber at all (visible cracks were present from before cleaning). I was pleased to say the least. Click image to enlarge.