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Clarity of Vision

Bench Racing

by Ryan King

Vision is a word that gets bandied about a lot, but I don't often see people that truly have a grasp of the concept with enough depth, breadth, or more importantly, detail.

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A few years ago I watched a Supercars episode about the development of the Pagani Huayra and I found myself struck by the vision of its creator, Horacio Pagani.

The truth is, before seeing this episode, I'd never heard of him.

But vision is something I understand and upon seeing his work, I could easily see he was a person of real vision. Vision with the kind of expanse and clarity necessary to achieve things – which is probably good since he designs, develops, and builds his own cars with his own company.

What intrigued me the most, however, was his devotion to the ideals of Leonardo da Vinci – the world's most famous polymath – and that his drive for achieving his vision extended from his cars – including every single part in them – to the custom architecture of his beautiful factory, and even the way he lives his life.

If you know me well enough, you know where this is going. I'm going to say something to the effect of "that's how to do it."

No half-assing it.

No saying "that's good enough."

No accepting of compromises that compromise the vision.

Now, granted, his immense skill is simply beyond the average person just like a pro football player, but the philosophy and the ideals still hold promise for anyone with a car hobby.

Sure, you can build junk out of a crappy, poorly lit, falling-down building that can barely keep the wind off you and accept it as good enough. And yes, with enough effort, you might even be able to turn out something nice with a lot less than ideal working conditions, but the truth is, just like professional auto mechanics have been taught to have the best tools, so too should that extend to every other aspect of an enthusiast's hobby.

Don't get me wrong, I know the car hobby is prohibitively expensive and extremely demanding, but I also know that every result is foundationally built on a philosophy, and that outcomes are directly related to what goes into them. So, as I see it, it's always best to start with the best – or at least the best you can manage – if you are going to achieve a quality outcome.

That is why vision, and its quality, play a critical role in any final result.

For more on Horacio Pagani – and maybe even get a little inspiration along the way – check out his company's site at www.pagani.com and the Supercars' episode "Pagani," as well an article in the August, 2017 issue of Automobile Magazine entitled "Horacio Pagani: From Supercars to a New Factory."

Ryan

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