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Road Testing the Detailing

Bench Racing

by Ryan King

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It took all of 30 or so miles to ruin the 61 hours of detailed work I did on the Cobalt.

Don't get me wrong, I didn't expect it to "survive" an eight day road trip across several states, climates, and elevations. However, I had hoped the body, itself, would survive the trip unscathed.

Instead, someone kicked up four rocks into the front of the car, chipped the glass in three places and put an inch and a half-long dent in the front of the hood.

This is going to be the third windshield I've put in this car. At this point, I think the Cobalt may be cursed. I've never had so much carnage done to the windshield of one car – at least, not right in my line of sight. The other cars I've owned have had the common decency of running other portions of their windshields into flying objects.

The rest of the car – besides the dust, bugs, and oily tar from the 19 miles of chip sealing road work I had to drive through – still looks great.

The drive out to Glacier National Park was fan-flippin-tastic.

After five years of dealing with the wear and tear placed on it by the previous owner, all of the demons have been completely exorcised and she drives like a dream.

With the suspension issues finally resolved, I've discovered that the Cobalt is very, very finicky when it comes to tire pressures. One pound off either way and her steering and handling are demons, get it RIGHT ON and she's a perfect angel. I mean nearly sublime – at least with the Michelin Pilot Sport A/S 3+ all seasons I keep on her.

I'll write more when I get back.

Ryan

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